I enjoy pretty much everything there is that has to do with the outdoors. Some of my most peaceful moments have been while walking through the forest, sitting on a beach, or boating (minus the loud engine). Accordingly I have a great respect for nature and enjoy learning about the plants and wildlife therein. My plan is to continue that learning process and hopefully enhance it by sharing what I learn. I intend for this blog to serve many purposes, but in the immediate future it will be a place for me, and hopefully others, to share ideas about reducing our individual impact on this planet, protecting wild spaces, and in general just to comment on the things we enjoy most in the great outdoors. I welcome all opinions as otherwise you cannot consider every aspect of a subject. However, I would ask that every opinion be expressed in a respectful way and considered with an open mind. Often there is no single right answer. Thanks.







Thursday, April 28, 2011

Baking Soda kills Moss


My moss solution...
 In addition to its many other uses I often read about baking soda being used in combination with water and/or vinegar as a more environmentally friendly way to clean your home.  A couple of years ago I came across a tip in a newsletter that suggested using baking soda to combat moss.  I read the newsletter around the time we moved into our new home, which had moss on the roof of the garage that the house inspector recommended we remove.  A thoughtful relative gave us some leftover chemicals from when they had their roof done and the white powder sat inside the bags for awhile as I tried to decide whether to give the random tip a try.

I finally bought one large box of baking soda about a year and a half ago and got out on the roof of the garage.  The two sentence tip really did not elaborate on how you used it: Must the surface be dry?, Should you dilute it with water? So I figured I would start with the one box and see what happened.  A dry roof just seemed better from a safety perspective so I went out there on a dry day and just sprinkled the baking soda directly from the box.  It certainly was not instant death, but the fact that it was no longer green was victory enough for me. 

Since that initial experiment I have sprinkled baking soda on the remainder of my garage roof and, while I figure that I should probably go out there at some point and remove the black, dead bits, I am very happy with the result.  I have had the moss regrow in only a couple of small spots, which I was quick to treat with the baking soda, and the rest just looks slimy during the rainy season and dried out in the summer.  Emboldened by my rooftop success I decided I would try it on the lawn.  The areas I tried out last year browned up quickly and have not regrown so I treated the rest of my backyard early this year.  I have several mossy spots in the front yard as well, but as they do not receive much sunlight I have left them for the time being.  I figure moss on the lawn is better than mud. 

Before I published this post I went looking for a couple of other perspectives and found one article that suggested, since moss can be partly caused by excess shade, you trim your tree branches - not a happening thing at my house.  I will take the tree branches over the lawn any day.  I also found a comment on the UBC Botanical Garden Blog that cautioned against using the baking soda undiluted and near grass.  I have not had a problem at all with the baking soda damaging my lawn.  The only thing brown is the moss.  I have noticed that if it does not rain the baking soda takes longer to do its job.  A couple of times I have applied the baking soda just before a light rain and it does seem that the moss browns up faster once it gets wet.

In the interest of maintaining the work done by the baking soda I saw a suggestion that you rake the dead moss out and follow up with over seeding.  A bit of compost would also likely help with the overall health of the lawn.  I also thought that before I put up a post claiming that baking soda was an environmentally friendly way to kill moss that I should check and see if I could find anything about the subject.  In that regard I found a blog posting from Green Living Tips that briefly describes the process of how baking soda is made.  You can check it out and decide for yourself.  Given the other options I saw of bleach, laundry detergent and zinc sulphate I am sticking with the baking soda.

11 comments:

  1. Very interesting! I had no idea. Might just have to give that a try. Thanks.

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  2. It makes sense to me, as moss likes acidic soils and baking soda is a neutralizer

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    1. Cool. I'm not very knowledgeable about the chemistry of healthy lawns. If your lawn is acidic I suppose there are some environmentally friendly ways of being proactive about your Ph levels. Feel free to post ideas in that regard.

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  3. Yeah people add lime to their lawns to neutralize them and prevent moss here in New England, home of acid soil (acid from all the pine needles). Since I did not have lime to spread on my mulch beds, I used baking soda sprinkled on the moss there. I searched the internet AFTER I did it and found this site to confirm my 'idea'. I hope it works!

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  4. I have used it several times to remove moss from my driveway and roof and it works great to kill the moss. I have yet to try it on my moss filled lawn but after reading this I think I will try. One caution with putting it on the roof. When I applied it with a spreader there was a little breeze and little got onto my deck. I thought nothing of it and did not rinse it off. After a couple of weeks I discovered that where the soda got on my deck that the finish(stain) has diss appeared and I had to re-stain the next spring. So beware of getting it on painted or stained surfaces.

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  5. Really? This would be best if it's really work. Will surely try this thans much.

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  6. I tried it on blacktop a few years and it worked well but after a couple years it came back, so do it again, it's nearly harmless.

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  7. I will have to try it on my driveway. There is some moss growing out of the cracks in my driveway. I will just pour some on it and see if it gets rid of it. http://www.victoriawindowcleaning.ca/

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  8. roof in Alaska I put on roofs sloped and flat to kill moss it killed it if you have tree branchs hunging over or touching roofing they need to cut back an up off roof

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